The True crime story of ex-NBA star Mookie Blaylock and more changes in the NIL world of college sports

In episode 249 of Sports Bliss with Rob and Kris, Kristie starts the episode sharing the true crime story of ex NBA star Mookie Blaylock. They discuss the troubles Blaylock experienced over his NBA career and the penalty he had to pay for his crimes. After this true crime story, they lighten the mood with a story about protestors in the NBA. Kristie suggests other ideas of how the protestors could sneak into future NBA games. Finally, Rob and Kristie discuss the continuing would of Name , Image, and Likeness in the college sports world. Rob shares examples of how certain boosters are directly paying players to induce them to their programs. They also discuss Notre Dame’s Jack Swarbrick’s recent comments on NIL and college sports and his prediction for the future of college sports.

As always Rob and Kristie end the episode with trivia and a would you rather.

If you enjoyed this episode please subscribe, rate, and tell your friends or anyone you think would enjoy our podcast. Text or leave voice messages for us at (407)494-6420 and we may read or play them on the next episode.

Transcript
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The opinions on this podcast are of the hosts and guests only and may contain childish humor. Listen at your own discretion and now please adjust your headphone volumes to an unreasonable level and prepare to enjoy the most dynamic and electrifying podcast that Cyberspace has encountered.

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Welcome back all of our sports fans and welcome to another episode of Sports List with Rob and Kris. I hope everybody had a fun, safe, happy weekend. We're a little bit messed up on our schedule. We're actually recording this, um, on Sunday because our son has a field trip and I have to be like, you know, Mom of the  year. So instead of talking about some, um, sports, I thought we could put a twist on it and do something that we haven't done in a while. A sports true crime episode and a little bit of sports news at the very end. So stay tuned. Hit it. That is right. We are here with a sports true crime episode. Let me just paint the picture for you guys. Let me set the stage of who I'm going to talk about today. You are a fantastic basketball player.

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Oh, why, thank you.

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You get drafted as the 12th pick overall.

Speaker:

Wait, I was never drafted. I was a fantastic basketball player, but I was never drafted.

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People love you. Your colleagues adore you.

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I'm suspecting you're talking about someone Besides me.

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Musicians even name. They're banned after you. I mean, if that doesn't set the stage right there, obviously people love this person.

Speaker:

Oh, I know who you're talking about.

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Now, if you still don't know who I'm talking about, I am talking about Mookie Blaylock. I don't think we should give him a round of applause.

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Well, I don't know what you're going to say.

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Mookie was one of my favorite players way back in the day because I kind of spoiled it a little bit.

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And I told you who I was going to be picking today. And you were like, oh, my gosh, I love Mookie Blaylock. And I was like, you don't know what he did.

Speaker:

No, I don't. I'm talking purely on the basketball court.

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You don't know what he did. And if you are a fan of Mookie, I don't know if you will be a fan after this. You'll be calling him Dookie Blaylock. So let me go over his story.

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Okay.

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Darren O'Shea. Moocie Lelock was born March 21, 967. The six foot push and pass point guard was highly rated the best defensive Stoppers in the game.

Speaker:

That sounds like Mookie.

Speaker:th overall pick in the:Speaker:

Yeah, I remember that.

Speaker:of his major issues. Okay. In:Speaker:

Yeah. It happens a lot for College athletes and for pro athletes.

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Yes. And, you know, I don't want to say that this is a bad thing. I mean, in a way, it's good because you're trying to not get the guy in trouble, however you're enabling him.

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Yeah. But you're also it's not right because you're putting them above the law.

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Absolutely.

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If it were you or I, we wouldn't get that.

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I understand. No, exactly. And I totally get it. If it were one instance, like, listen, wrong timing. It's completely out of character and that they're this huge star and they don't want to tarnish a reputation.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:s like a regular occasion. In:Speaker:

Because when it was that was a long time ago, too. Yeah. I mean, that's 13 years ago.

Speaker:hree different DUI charges in:Speaker:

Well, I mean, it means he's used to drinking.

Speaker:er DUI charge. In November of:Speaker:

Yeah, kind of. That reminds me of the episode of Office when Meredith and then go to the mall and she pulls into the parking space, it's like, tiny. And she just totally goes all the way down.

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The side of the cars are literally you hear sparks, and she's like, I don't think I'm going to fix it.

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This one's a little tight, so I'm going to find another spot.

Speaker:is is serious time. In May of:Speaker:

Right?

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So they're at the red light turns green. They started moving along as normal traffic would. As they continue driving, a black Escalade starts approaching them on the driver's side, going 50 miles an hour at a 40 deg angle. You can't see me right now, but I'm actually like, I'm doing it with my hands. Can we guess who was in the Escalade? It was Mookie. As you hear this, you probably think he was impaired, but actually he was sober during this car crash. He was actually suffering a seizure, which was due to alcohol withdrawal. So he was having a seizure at the time of the car accident. Monica was killed, and Frank was seriously injured in the crash. Mookie had several seizures leading up to, uh, this weeks leading up to this crash. I don't know what was going on with him. Um, he was detoxing from alcohol, and it seems in a really bad way. Seizing, he decided to go to the doctor to go and get, like, checked out. It was highly advice from his doctor to not drive.

Speaker:

Yes, usually in those situations, they tell you not to drive.

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Yeah. So the doctor is like, hey, listen, pal, you cannot drive. I have this form that you need to sign because he basically took away his license.

Speaker:

Yeah, that's what you're supposed to do with the doctor. Actually, when a patient seizes, you're supposed to report them to the DMV.

Speaker:which was the DUI charges in:Speaker:

No, I suspect it's not going to happen.

Speaker:rial took place in October of:Speaker:

Right.

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And serve large amounts of community service and is forbidden to drive for 15 years.

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Probably doesn't stop him from driving, though.

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I don't know. I mean, like, if he had the form signed and he's actively having seizures, and if he's literally guzzling bottles of whatever to get his legal alcohol limit, three times the legal limit. So that's the story of Mookie Blaylock. Drinking responsibly can always be fun in controlled social situations. Guys, please take this stuff seriously. If you're drinking, don't get behind the wheel. If you feel out of control and having a hard time with alcohol, go get some help. There's always resources. There's no shame in anything anymore. There's really no excuse. It's not worth it to put yourself, your loved ones, or other people in danger because you want to have a good time. Okay, as we decompress from that crazy story, let's do something a little bit more light. And, Rob, tell us what's going on in the sports world.

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Okay. There's a couple of things going on I want to touch on some nil name image like this, because it's like getting even crazier, and I just want to.

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It's getting crazier than it already is.

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Yeah. I'm going to share some things with you.

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Okay.

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But also, I want to share this kind of weird story. So there's a story, and I'll show you the video real quick. But there's the story of the Minnesota Timberwolves'right there in the play offs right now against the Memphis Grizzlies.

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Yeah.

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Well, apparently the owners of the Timber Wolves, they also own a poultry, uh, processing plant or chicken processing plant.

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Okay.

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No big deal, right? Sure. These guys have all types of different businesses, right?

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Yeah.

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Well, apparently there have been animal activists basically protesting against them at the games. I've seen this going on for a couple of weeks, but it kind of hit the head the other day. Okay, so a couple of weeks ago, this woman actually glued her hand to the court and didn't want to leave, so they had to go out there and pry her hand off of the court before the game could start.

Speaker:

What kind of glue was she using?

Speaker:

I hope it wasn't gorilla glue, because that would be another animal abuse. I don't know what it was, but let me just show you this video real quick.

Speaker:

Is that the same woman?

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Is the same woman shows up again.

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Why wasn't she thrown out the first time then?

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She was, but apparently, uh, she snuck back in the game. Okay. She snuck back in. I think this first one happened before the playoffs. This is fast forward. They're playing in Minnesota. Okay, well, she went as far as to disguise herself. Her outfit basically looked like a referee uniform, like she had it on underneath, and then she took it off, and she kind of looked like a referee. And then she sneaks down to the edge of the court and runs out on the court. And you saw how quick the cop was on her.

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She did that far?

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No, but that cop was, like, all over her.

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Right. I wonder if somebody spotted her.

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That's what everybody thinks.

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They think that they saw her and they were trying to send her because they were literally right in front of her.

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Yeah, but how often do you see someone storm the court during a game? Like, never?

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Never. I don't think in basketball, I don't think I've ever seen it.

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I've seen it during time outs, like, people being kind of crazy or whatever, but not in the middle of the game.

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So why is she so against? Like, what is she protesting?

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She's an animal rights person, and they treat the chickens pretty poorly. We watch the documentaries and all. We eat meat, so, I mean, we eat a lot of chicken, but they don't treat them very well. And I think most people don't think of where the food actually comes from. They're just like, oh, it's at your grocery store and you pick it up. But I don't know, I just thought it was kind of funny. She dresses as a referee, gets out on the court, and it's taken down.

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That is crazy.

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So I don't know if she's going to keep doing this, because this is the second time.

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Did they arrest her?

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I think so. I think she did. And I'm sure she's going to be banned, and they're going to have her picture up everywhere. She somehow got back in again. I want to see if she can do it a third time.

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Well, if she gets in the third time, she's got to raise the stakes even higher.

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What she should do, wear a chicken soup?

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No, I think she should show up and be like the people with the concessions that are carrying.

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Like, the beer guy.

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That would be pretty good. So let's move on a little bit. Let's hit in some nil because it's getting pretty crazy. Okay, where should we start with this? There's a couple of things. So Terry Mahazir, the ad for UCF he went on the local news here, and he was being interviewed, like on the sports show.

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Okay.

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And he was talking about how he's really against this, the way Nil's going. He's like, I'm very supportive of student athletes getting money. And he's like, I feel like we're doing it right here at UCF, meaning letting the students pursue opportunities to get sponsorships and this sort of thing. But it's getting where it's basically just pay for play. Right. We've talked about this before where there's the collective and then the things called directives that are the big boosters and they basically just pay the players. So a couple of things came out this week. Number one, Oklahoma came out and the ex coach, Barry Switzer, who got in a bunch of trouble when he was the coach there before he coached the Cowboys for paying players.

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Okay.

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He came out and introduced, which is so ironic. He introduces their new Nil program, and basically the program is going to pay every player on the team $50,000.

Speaker:

What?

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Yeah, it's going to pay every player on the team $50,000, and they're going to roll it out for basketball, too. And softball control getting out of control. They don't mention any way that they're going to earn the money. Do you know what I mean? They're just like, oh.

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Everybody earn the money.

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We're reading between the lines. They're not going to earn it. They basically, if you show up, you get it.

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Yeah. And that wasn't the intent of this law or this bill that passed state by state. It was meant that kids could go out and earn money on their own.

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I said it before. I say, um, it again, that does not include taxes.

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Oh, no.

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So how do you guys think you're cashing out? You ain't.

Speaker:redictions is that by the mid:Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:e reason it's going to be the:Speaker:

Expire like all the TV contracts, right?

Speaker:the ACC and that goes through:Speaker:

Yeah, sure.

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But he doesn't feel that it's right just to pay players.

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I agree.

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An example came out within the last, I don't know, 48, 72 hours. There's this player that is transferring from Kansas State University, a basketball player. He's a sophomore, so he has two more years. He'll be a junior this fall. He's transferring to the University mhm of Miami, and he was just given an Nil um deal by their biggest booster who owns Life wallet for $800,000, $400,000 a year. And he tweeted it out. He's like, this kid is going to get paid $400,000 a year for the next two years. We're going to recruit the best players. And this so this is creating a situation where I think the schools that don't jump into it are being smart, actually, they don't have the money to do it because what's going to happen when Miami doesn't win a National Championship in any sport in the next three years. After these guys are giving million dollars to these players over and over again.

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They'Re going to stop giving money.

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You're going to be pissed, right?

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Um, yeah.

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So then they're going to say, oh, the coach needs to be fired. The players need to be fired.

Speaker:

I feel like, stop the deal. What are we doing here? What is the end result? Because I feel like it's not worse. Basically, the NCAA is completely blown up. It has completely imploded on itself and there's no end in sight. There's no way to fix it because you can't go back and say, well, players can't get paid because you know they're getting paid regardless what happened before, you can't go back and say, well, you can't get paid because they're still going to get paid well.

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And that's what Jack Swarbrick said. He's the ID of Notre Dame. He said, listen, schools have been doing this.

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They've been paying players.

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He's like, no, this just allows them not to hide it, number one. But then it encourages other schools to jump in that were afraid before to break the rules that now there are going to be more schools doing it.

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It is the Wild West.

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Right now it's the total Wild West. And he said the NCAA cannot fix this. He said they don't have control and he said their solution is to give it back to the conferences. Do you think if they say to Greg Sinky, oh, you need to police all the schools and SEC for violating these rules, what's going to happen? Nothing. Why would he punish his own schools from having an advantage if they want to pay players and do that? He doesn't care.

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That's why I'm saying, what is the end result? I'm really confused because where are we going? Where are we headed right now?

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I think that's what all these ads are struggling with because he even went a step further and said part of the problem is the NCAA cannot enforce this. So they've turned it back over to the conferences. He said he even spoke to Congress because he was on the playoff committee and that was one of the things he was trying to get to because he said that would really financially help all the institutions and kind of level the field some. Right. And he said it will be a twelve team playoff. It's just a matter of time. It will happen. He even went to state representatives to Congress, uh, to see if they would do something about it because he's like, there needs to be one central point that oversees this and makes the rules for everyone to follow. Right. The reason the NCAA can't is because he said the University presidents can't agree upon anything. He said they're too worried about their school budgets to be honest to deal with this athletic issue.

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They don't care.

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He's like, they're more worried about their enrollment and making the budget for the whole University than worrying about athletics. And so he said this would be a time when it would be appropriate for the government to step in and make an overall rule for all the States. But he said, the politicians are like, we're not touching this.

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They don't want to get involved.

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They're not going to get involved.

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This is like a very messy situation. And I feel like anybody that gets involved with it is not going to be good for them.

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Yeah. His prediction is a lot like what other people said. I tend to agree with him is that the natural course of things will play out, because people are not going to keep giving money over and over for things like this with no return.

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Right.

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And then kids are going to get burned because they're going to sign away their nil deals. And really, they're breaking the law. They're breaking what the laws are of it because you're not supposed to entice kids to go to your school with this. So how does this kid from California that's supposedly going to Tennessee and already has a deal for $8 million, how does that not entice him to go to Tennessee?

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I don't even know what to say to this, because this has been happening for years. It's going to continue to happen even if they like I said, if they reverse it, it's still going to happen. I don't know. This is why I was really against it from the beginning, because I feel like it's completely gone out of control now.

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Yeah. I want to make it clear I have no problem with kids getting paid. I don't blame the kids in this situation. I don't blame the kids in this situation.

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I kind of have a problem with them getting paid.

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Well, I don't.

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And I'm not saying this because I don't think that they're not entitled to have money. Like, of course you can have money whatever you want to do. But if you're there for a full scholarship, basically your home and board is paid for. You can eat whenever you want for free. You have everything handed to you. You don't have to pay a bill. You don't have to pay anything. So why do these kids need to go out and make all these millions right now? That's not taking into account that they get like ten grand a year just for themselves? I think so. That is where I'm having a hard time, because it's like, I don't understand. Why do you need to create this narrative that kids are in a situation where they're struggling and I'm talking purely about the kids, uh, that are on scholarship? No, I struggling financially that are struggling to pay bills, that are struggling to eat, to drive themselves to practice. These kids that are in full scholarship, they don't know what it's like right now.

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I think that narrative was created to create empathy for student athletes and the people that know. No, they know that's not true. But from my standpoint, I have no problem with a kid. Any kid that goes to College or doesn't go to College, they should be able to make as much money as they want to make. And it shouldn't matter if their own scholarship or not. The problem I have is at a point if you're making like this kid that we know documented now he's making 400 grand a year, why is he not paying mhm taxes on all of his benefits? Meaning the 60 or 100 grand? Because it's expensive to go to Miami out of state, right? Yeah, it's expensive mhm. So probably his total cost is close to 100 grand a year to go to Miami. Yeah, right. That's what he's getting for scholarship. So why isn't he getting taxed on 500 grand instead of 400 grand? Why should he be getting government assistance to go to Miami? He shouldn't. If I was making 400 grand a year, I wouldn't be getting government assistance to go to school.

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I was saying this is a total mess.

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No, it's a business then. So if people want to be dumb enough to pay a kid 400 grand and not get any return on it, that's their business. You can do that. But they're also breaking the rules because the rules say clearly that you can only pay them for market value of whatever service they're providing for you. Meaning if you go to my school as a gymnast, let's say. Right. And you have 3 million followers on TikTok, I could probably pay you a million dollars a year to rep my brand.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:looked at his Twitter, he has:Speaker:

Any sense.

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No, it doesn't match the value of his services.

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This just gives me a headache.

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But I think in the next couple of years you're going to see this kind of run its course because people are going to be like, I'm not going to give money like this anymore.

Speaker:

I disagree. No, I don't think it's going to stop. If anything, it's going to get worse than it already is.

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I think the ones that have always given money will still give money.

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Absolutely.

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Like they gave it under the table. Yeah, but that's the way it's always been. But I think there's an extra juice in it right now because mhm, that guy gets a lot of media attention because he says, oh, I'm paying him 800 grand probably in every newspaper. So I don't know, I think eventually it'll run its course, but because people are going to get sick of it. But we'll see.

Speaker:

It'S trivia time. And since I did the sports true crime story, when I was busy getting all my information, Rob was really nice and he said, you know what? Let me do trivia today. And I was like, oh, gosh, I'm scared because I don't know. This is definitely in the air. I don't know. Sometimes I know things, sometimes I don't. So bring it.

Speaker:

All right, trivia. Harry Potter edition. Your favorite. Uh, do you want to just keep going and see how many you can get in a row, or do you just want one?

Speaker:

Just do one.

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I have a card from our Trivial Pursuit Harry Potter Wizarding World Edition.

Speaker:

What is it on? I know you said Harry Potter.

Speaker:

But, like, what's the subcategory Magical Objects for 100, Alex.

Speaker:

Okay, bring it.

Speaker:

Where did Fred and George first get the Marauder's map? And don't ask for multiple choice because I have no idea the answers to any of these.

Speaker:

Okay, so this is the map that was in the third book movie, which is the Prisoner of Akban.

Speaker:

You're stalling. I love it.

Speaker:

No, I'm explaining because some people might not know what that means. So it is the map where basically you can see where everybody is in the Castle. It was previous owned, um, by Sirius Black and, like a few others.

Speaker:

You want me to give you a hint?

Speaker:

And I want to say it was passed down or they found it.

Speaker:

Yeah, they got it from somewhere. It was from someone's office.

Speaker:

Dumbledore's office.

Speaker:

I'll give you one more Snape's office.

Speaker:

Um, Filch's office.

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Um.

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That'S right. Because it was confiscated and they found it.

Speaker:

They did. Let me give you one more to redeem yourself.

Speaker:

Okay.

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In which part of Hogwarts Castle does the troll find Hermia before Harry and Ron come to the rescue?

Speaker:

It's the downstairs women's bathroom. That was too easy.

Speaker:

Yeah. I wanted you to redeem yourself, so great job, baby.

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Thank you.

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All right, I have a good would you rather and we'll wrap it up with this.

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Okay.

Speaker:

Since the NBA draft is coming up, I know the NFL draft is coming up this week, and we'll talk about it next week after the draft. Who our teams get, of course, but the NBA draft is coming up for the Magic. So my question was inspired by some of the playoffs that we've been watching and the players you love so much, like Kyrie Irving.

Speaker:

Oh, my God, I love Kyrie.

Speaker:

But also Stephanie Curry, which you do like, my boy. Yeah. Which type of player would you rather take? I'm going to give you a scenario, okay? So you can take whatever player you want, but you're on the clock and you have the choice between a player and you can see into the future. Okay.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:

You can see into the future. That's what makes this interesting. You can take a player who is of the storyline, I would say, of Kyrie Irving. Kind of controversial. People don't like him. He's difficult. All these sort of things going against the rules.

Speaker:

He's a flat Earther.

Speaker:

It could be whatever, but people just don't like him. And he's not very marketable per se. Right.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:

But he's a really good player. And, you know, with this player, you are going to be at least in the conference finals every year. You have him. Not the NBA finals, but the conference finals. You're going to make it that far. But you don't know if you win the Championship or not. You can't see past that. Or you can take a player that's very morally like, no problems, very likable like Stephen Curry is a great player, great potential, but you can't see into his future. You can't see if you even make the playoffs with this player. But he has great potential, just like the other guy. Who are you going to take?

Speaker:

This is like a no brainer for me. I'm going to have to go with Stephen Curry.

Speaker:

Even though he may never make the playoffs.

Speaker:

I know. But to me, knowing that about a player like Kyrie Irving, completely controversial, I feel like there's going to be a lot more bad things than good things that come out of it. Even though you're going to be really far in winning, you know what I'm saying? I don't think that that justifies I can't be around somebody that I can't fully get behind. And I don't want to have to defend this player over and over and over again because his actions are undefendable.

Speaker:

Yeah. Like this player is going to have all kinds of off the core issues, legal issues, burners and whatever.

Speaker:

Basically, bro, I don't have time for shenanigans. I want to win. I want to have a good team. I want to have people that are pretty much good people, morally good people, whatever. People make mistakes, whatever. I would rather take a chance on that, knowing I don't know, Stefan Curry's fate or our fate as a team. I'd rather take that chance.

Speaker:

So another way to state this is you would rather have a clean program.

Speaker:

Yes.

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And possibly lose than have a dirty program and guaranteed to win.

Speaker:

Yeah, because that's like making a deal with the devil. You can't. It's blood money. You can't do that. But for me, that is my moral Compass.

Speaker:

With that being said, you're going to denounce your fandom of the Florida Gators now.

Speaker:

I mean, walked right into that one.

Speaker:

He walked into that one.

Speaker:

Listen, I will always love my Gators, okay? But I will say things that have happened throughout the years. It definitely makes me like 1ft out the door.

Speaker:

No, I hear you.

Speaker:

And I'm being honest. I love my team. I will always have my team's back or whatever. But sometimes when Urban was there, you can't defend these things. You can't defend having Aaron Hernandez with murdering people. You can't have Tim Tebow trying to cover it up because he has a good moral Compass and he's religious like you can't do that. You can't do these things.

Speaker:

I was going to ask you another question. I was going to ask you which would you rate as potentially the dirtiest coach urban Meyer no, as the dirtiest coach for Florida and I was going to give you a choice and this is by the end of their career so you have to see in the future I was going to say Charlie Pell which you don't know. I don't know him but he was Gater football coach in the 80s and he was super dirty. He was caught paying all the players and all this sort of stuff, you know. And he got fired and they got on suspension and this sort of thing. But him urban Meyer or Billy Napier.

Speaker:

Well, okay. Obviously I have to go with urban Meyer. Billy Napier he's still new. Uh, I cannot go off of my psychic abilities because they have not yet happened.

Speaker:

Well and I think Billy Napier has to his benefit he has looser rules now so he can do a lot of the things that he can basically do what Charlie Pell did but legally meaning he can pay players. He doesn't have to as long as he doesn't cover up things.

Speaker:

But he already did.

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It's starting out kind of shaky, right?

Speaker:

He already did. All right, guys, we're going to wrap up today's episode. I hope everybody has a fun and safe day and we will catch you guys on Friday. Bye. Love you so much.

Speaker:

Thank you for listening to sports bliss with Rob and Chris available on anchor FM, Apple podcast, Spotify and everywhere else. Fine podcast for fans. Follow us on Instagram and leave voice comments at this has been a sports clip with Rob and Chris productions.

Speaker:

Sorry.

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